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About this Episode

Surely, Black people began dreaming beyond the American shoreline soon after their arrival. Centuries later, spurred by racist policies, a need for political and professional affirmation, and an expanded worldview following World War 1, Black people began an exodus to build lives in other countries, with different languages, and new possibilities. In this episode, we center the Black woman expatriate—growing in numbers in recent years—and the experiences that led her elsewhere.

In this Episode

Audrey Edwards

JOURNALIST, AND AUTHOR OF AMERICAN RUNAWAY: BLACK AND FREE IN PARIS IN THE TRUMP YEARS

“I love how I feel in Paris. The big difference to me . . is that they are not constantly reacting to my color. In America, race permeates everything.”

Charlotte Van Horn

And tell you the truth, the whole safety element feeling safe allows you to feel peaceful. Peaceful is the new wealthy. Money can’t buy you that.” 

Cynthia Simmons

ACTRESS, PRODUCER, AND ADVOCATE

“I had been hearing about San Miguel de Allende, Mexico for a very long time. It was known as an arts community…so I knew that this was a creative artists place. And when I got here, it was so easy.”

Julia Browne

“The 1920s was a period of flourishing and bringing your talent to the foreground, no matter what you did, whether you were a young writer like Gwendolyn Bennett or a journalist like Jesse Fawcett…you could shine in Paris.”

Evita Turquoise Robinson

“Put the fear in [your] back pocket long enough to just get on the plane… You’d be surprised how you show up for yourself when you are out [in] the world.”

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